An analysis of the arguments about the muslim veil

The Politics of the Veil. Princeton University Press, Although the ban applied to all religions, including Jewish yarmulkes, Sikh turbans, and large Christian crosses, the ban primarily targeted young Muslim women who wore headscarves because the scarves were allegedly symbols of Islamic extremism and oppression. In Politics of the Veil, however, Joan Wallach Scott complicates the idea that Muslim headscarves were banned in France because they were symbolic of insidious Islamic politics.

An analysis of the arguments about the muslim veil

McGill University Abstract This article goes behind stereotypes of Muslim veiling to ask after the representational structure underlying these images. I examine the public debate leading to the French law banning conspicuous religious signs in schools and French colonial attitudes to veiling in Algeria, in conjunction with discourses on the veil that have arisen in other western contexts.

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My argument is that western perceptions and representations of veiled Muslim women are not simply about Muslim women themselves. Rather than representing Muslim women, these images fulfill a different function: It is by means of the projection of gender oppression onto Islam, and its naturalization to the bodies of veiled women, that such mirroring takes place.

This constitutes, I argue, a form of racialization. Drawing on the work of Fanon, Merleau-Ponty and Alcoff, I offer a phenomenological analysis of this racializing vision.

What is at stake is a form of cultural racism that functions in the guise of anti-sexist and feminist liberatory discourse, at once posing a dilemma to feminists and concealing its racializing logic Keywords.The racialization of Muslim veils: A philosophical analysis Alia Al-Saji Department of Philosophy, McGill University, Canada Abstract This article goes behind stereotypes of Muslim veiling to ask after the representational structure.

Lindsay reviews historian Joan Scott's Politics of the Veil and evaluates its claims about French racism and xenophobia towards Muslims.

An analysis of the arguments about the muslim veil

Lindsay reviews historian Joan Scott's Politics of the Veil and evaluates its claims about French racism and xenophobia towards Muslims. In Politics of the Veil, however, Joan Wallach Scott complicates the idea that Muslim headscarves were banned in France because they were symbolic of insidious Islamic politics.

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According to Scott’s analysis of French discourse on the subject, the prohibition stems from France’s xenophobia towards Algerian immigrants, which manifested in racist and paternalistic views towards France’s Muslim population.

This article goes behind stereotypes of Muslim veiling to ask after the representational structure underlying these images. I examine the public debate leading to the French law banning conspicuous religious signs in schools and French colonial attitudes to veiling in Algeria, in conjunction with discourses on the veil that have arisen in other western contexts.

Veil Debate in France and the United States, December to June (Under the direction of Don Reid) This essay explores the role of Orientalism in contemporary Western society thro ugh an analysis of the debate over the Muslim veil or hijab, in public schools in France and the United States, between December and June Muslim veils: A philosophical analysis Alia Al-Saji Department of Philosophy, McGill University, Canada Abstract This article goes behind stereotypes of Muslim veiling to ask after the representational structure underlying these images.

I examine the public debate leading to the French law banning.

An analysis of the arguments about the muslim veil
Arguments against the veil | Farheen's Niqab Blog