How fair is the electoral college

Here's a little information that Americans have usually been able to ignore. It's about the Electoral College, a uniquely American institution that's been with us from the beginning and that's occasionally given us fits. Typically, the Electoral College meets and does its thing a month or so after the election, and few people even notice or care. Once in a while, though, people do notice and do care — a lot.

How fair is the electoral college

How does the Electoral College work and is it fair? | MPR News

Electoral College members cast votes in Albany, N. AP Here's a little information that Americans have usually been able to ignore.

How fair is the electoral college

It's about the Electoral College, a uniquely American institution that's been with us from the beginning and that's occasionally given us fits. Typically, the Electoral College meets and does its thing a month or so after the election, and few people even notice or care. Once in a while, though, people do notice and do care — a lot.

Will be one of those years? It's not something reasonable people would hope for, but it cannot be ruled out. How It Works Despite popular belief, the U. Constitution does not provide for the popular election of the American president.

It provides for popular election of presidential electors. Each candidate who qualifies for a given state's ballot must designate certain individuals who will serve as his or her electors if that candidate wins the popular vote in that state.

When each state certifies a winner of its overall popular vote, that winner is entitled to send all his or her electors to that state's Capitol, where they will officially record their votes for their candidate. All the electors in all the states do it on the same day, the first Monday after the second Wednesday of December.

This year it is Dec. In these proceedings in the states, the winner of the statewide popular vote generally takes all the Electoral College votes, a rule stretching back to Two states, Maine and Nebraska, have instituted a different system, giving two electoral votes to the statewide winner and one to the winner of each of the state's congressional districts.

This is allowed as the Constitution enables individual states to determine the manner of their elections. Other states have recently considered doing this as well. Maine has two districts, so its vote can be split as it appears likely to be this year.

Nebraska has three districts, so it could split or Nebraska had a split inwhen its Omaha-based district voted for Barack Obama while the other districts went easily for John McCain. Some states have also considered a rather more exotic idea: This would serve to undercut the Electoral College's "indirect democracy" and elevate the idea of a national choice, regardless of state lines.An Electoral College that failed to produce a majority winner would trigger a constitutional provision by which the president would be chosen by the House of Representatives.

Jan 18,  · The Electoral College was not designed to be fair; it was designed to counterbalance unfairness in the rest of the design of the United States federal government.

Is the electoral college "fair"? | Yahoo Answers

Disclaimer: I’m a New Hampshire resident, therefore a small state resident who benef. Mar 06,  · Best Answer: The electoral college is fair. Keep in mind the president is not supposed to represent the people or be elected by the people. Please read Article II of the U S initiativeblog.com: Resolved.

Maine has two districts, so its vote can be split (as it appears likely to be this year). Nebraska has three districts, so it could split or The electoral college isn't a perfect system, and with two of the past five presidential elections going to the candidate who didn't win the popular vote, calls to abolish the centuries-old system.

Oct 28,  · Best Answer: No, I don't feel the electoral college is fair, at all.

How fair is the electoral college

This was something I learned 25 years ago in elementary school. I think most of us were given the example of how someone could win the popular vote, but still lose the election, based on the electoral initiativeblog.com: Resolved.

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